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An armband with the Star of David and a badge for a forced laborer in Germany at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is shown during a preview of the exhibit “Some Were Neighbors: Collaboration & Complicity in the Holocaust” in Skip Tracer Professional Washington. Carolyn Kaster — The Associated Press file By Encarnacion Pyle, The Columbus Dispatch via AP The exhibit at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, titled “Some Were Neighbors: Collaboration & Complicity in the Holocaust” in Washington. Carolyn Kaster — The Associated Press file COLUMBUS >> Growing up, Richard Makowski knew that his father had been imprisoned in a German concentration camp during World War II as an American citizen in Europe suspected of helping Poles resist the Nazis. But he didn’t dare ask for any details because his mother, Anne, warned it would give his dad terrible nightmares. And nobody — least of all him — wanted that. As the years went by, Makowski intended to bring up the subject, but his father, Benedict Makowski, always seemed to be working. Then the elder Makowski died in 1977 at age 60 from stomach cancer, ending any more chances to ask. With Holocaust survivors getting older and dying, it’s becoming harder for their loved ones to fill in the blanks of their family history. Makowski, 64, of German Village, turned to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington for help. Researchers there did everything possible to piece together what happened to his dad by scouring documents scooped up by Allied troops and put into a once secretive, but now public archive. During the war, the Nazis kept meticulous records of their concentration and forced labor camps, as well as some ghettos.

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